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Lawns Closed Today
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Lawns Open    Lawns Closed
Madison Square Park Conservancy is responsible for the maintenance of the park’s lawns, which includes closing the lawns each year from October through May for reseeding. With the heightened need for public space, the Conservancy has kept the lawns open throughout the pandemic. For the month of April, all lawns will be closed to reestablish the grass in time for summer.
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Black tupelo

Black tupelo

Nyssa sylvatica 'NSUHH' Green Gable (TN)
Black Tupleo

Our group of Black tupelo trees bring a flare of orange, scarlet, and purple to the park in fall. These remarkable trees grow to between 60–80 feet and can live to be over 650 years old. They have glossy dark green leaves in summer and unique rough bark that looks like an alligator hide. 

In springtime, tupelos produce very small, greenish-white flowers that are a rich source or nectar. Its flowers are a favorite of bees and make delicious honey. Their dark blue stone fruits are bitter tasting to humans, but sought out by many birds, including the American Robin, Northern Cardinal, and Bluejay. 

The species’ common name, tupelo, is of Native American origin, coming from the Creek tribe’s words for tree ito, and swamp opilwa. The name tupelo is primarily used by people in the American South, whereas up north and in Appalachia, it’s more commonly called the Black gum tree.

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Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom
Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom, Narrated by Brooke Kamin Rappoport
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