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Lawns Closed Today
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Lawns Open    Lawns Closed

Madison Square Park Conservancy is responsible for the maintenance of the park’s lawns. From May through September, lawns are open daily for public use starting at 10 AM through 9 PM, weather permitting. Learn more about park hours and rules by visiting our FAQ page.

Plants of the Pine Barrens

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on view

Plants of the Pine Barrens

May 25 – October 18, 2021
on view

Plants of the Pine Barrens

May 25 – October 18, 2021
20201107_101455
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When you visit the park’s gardens this summer, you will be transported to the Pine Barrens, a unique regional ecosystem found in New York and New Jersey. Prior to urbanization, Madison Square Park once had similar plant communities to those of the Pine Barrens––swamps, forests, and savanas once covered Manhattan before the formation of the city grid. 

Urban areas are often replanted with exotic plants from Europe, Asia, and elsewhere. The bugs, birds, and other wildlife that depended on native plants are declining as their food and habitat no longer support them. By using native plants as ornamentals, we can create beautiful landscapes that support wildlife. It is time for American gardens to return to their roots and embrace the beauty of our natural heritage.

Located around The Fountain and Reflecting Pool, visitors will soon learn more about our unique regional ecosystems, threats to our green spaces, and have the opportunity to see plants absent from the landscape for hundreds of years.

When you visit the park’s gardens this summer, you will be transported to the Pine Barrens, a unique regional ecosystem found in New York and New Jersey. Prior to urbanization, Madison Square Park once had similar plant communities to those of the Pine Barrens––swamps, forests, and savanas once covered Manhattan before the formation of the city grid. 

Urban areas are often replanted with exotic plants from Europe, Asia, and elsewhere. The bugs, birds, and other wildlife that depended on native plants are declining as their food and habitat no longer support them. By using native plants as ornamentals, we can create beautiful landscapes that support wildlife. It is time for American gardens to return to their roots and embrace the beauty of our natural heritage.

Located around The Fountain and Reflecting Pool, visitors will soon learn more about our unique regional ecosystems, threats to our green spaces, and have the opportunity to see plants absent from the landscape for hundreds of years.

Exhibition Support
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Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom
Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom, Narrated by Brooke Kamin Rappoport
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