Skip to main content
Image replaced with SVGInject
Lawns Open Today
Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject   | Open 10 AM – 5 PM | visit >
Lawns Open    Lawns Closed

Madison Square Park Conservancy is responsible for the maintenance of the park’s lawns. Lawns are open daily for public use starting at 10 AM through 5 PM, weather permitting. Lawns are closed on Parade Days.  Learn more about park hours and rules by visiting our FAQ page.

The Art of Drying Cut Flowers

Sep 27, 2022 | Horticulture

The Art of Drying Cut Flowers

Dry Flower Crop
IMG 3624
Dry Flower Crop
Image replaced with SVGInject
Image replaced with SVGInject

Drying cut flowers is a great way to extend their life and beauty. You can keep them in a vase to make winter indoors a little more cheerful, or create a wreath to welcome visitors at your front door.

Many of the flowers in our Spring Forward, Into Summer exhibition were trialed for their ability to be dried. Not all flowers will hold their color or delicate shape once dried, so it’s important to try out a few species to see which ones work best. Gomphrena, Eryngium, and lavender are all good candidates for drying. And if you have any extra herbs at the end of the season, they can be dried for use in winter cooking or in a potpourri!

There are a few different methods that can be used when drying your blooms. Drying silica is good for projects that require your flowers to hold their actual shape. Plant presses, on the other hand, flatten and make perfect, delicate specimens for coaster-making projects or framed wedding flowers. You can also try hanging whole flowers upside down, by their stalks, in a cool, dry room away from direct sunlight. The drying process for each of these can take anywhere from one week to one month.

It’s best to know ahead of time what you want to use your flowers for before you dry them. If you’re unsure, then drying them upside down is usually a safe choice. This way, once they’re dry, you can use them whole or break flattened petals off for delicate jar displays.

You can also mix your dried flower stalks into fresh arrangements throughout the year. Any way you decide to use dried flowers, they will be sure to brighten up a space!

Image replaced with SVGInject
Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×

playImage replaced with SVGInject
Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom
Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom, Narrated by Brooke Kamin Rappoport
closeImage replaced with SVGInject
Image replaced with SVGInject
Image replaced with SVGInject