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Lawns Closed Today
Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject   | Reseeding in progress
Lawns Open    Lawns Closed
Madison Square Park Conservancy is responsible for the maintenance of the park’s lawns, which includes closing the lawns each year from October through May for reseeding. With the heightened need for public space, the Conservancy has kept the lawns open throughout the pandemic. For the month of April, all lawns will be closed to reestablish the grass in time for summer.

Paula Hayes: Gazing Globes

Paula Hayes 9
Past Exhibition

Paula Hayes: Gazing Globes

February 19 – 19, 2015
Past Exhibition

Paula Hayes: Gazing Globes

February 19 – 19, 2015
Paula Hayes 9
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Paula Hayes’s first outdoor sculpture exhibition in New York City, Gazing Globes, features eighteen transparent polycarbonate spheres that hold the remnants of contemporary culture, including up-cycled radio parts, industrial materials, acrylic wands, and other pieces of vintage technology sprinkled with fairy dust made of pulverized CDs. Formed into beauteous objects, Hayes’s crystal balls positioned on elegant fiberglass pedestals summon the present and predict the future. 

Each see-through globe — 16, 18, and 24 inches in diameter on 24 to 27 inches high pedestals — are lit from within and include analog radio parts, castoff electronic transistor parts, glass vacuum tubes, micro glass beads, shredded rubber tires, and recycled plastic flotsam. To these mixed remnants of technology and culture the artist added adds crystals and minerals. Hayes, who typically works with varieties of plant materials, determines that everyday castoffs are indicative of a society’s behavior and value system and symptomatic of the current landscape. The works become a forest of objects for viewers to walk around and through. Gazing globes are a decorative form first used in outdoor gardens in the Middle Ages and were thought to hold magical power and to foster good luck or ward off evil.

Paula Hayes’s first outdoor sculpture exhibition in New York City, Gazing Globes, features eighteen transparent polycarbonate spheres that hold the remnants of contemporary culture, including up-cycled radio parts, industrial materials, acrylic wands, and other pieces of vintage technology sprinkled with fairy dust made of pulverized CDs. Formed into beauteous objects, Hayes’s crystal balls positioned on elegant fiberglass pedestals summon the present and predict the future. 

Each see-through globe — 16, 18, and 24 inches in diameter on 24 to 27 inches high pedestals — are lit from within and include analog radio parts, castoff electronic transistor parts, glass vacuum tubes, micro glass beads, shredded rubber tires, and recycled plastic flotsam. To these mixed remnants of technology and culture the artist added adds crystals and minerals. Hayes, who typically works with varieties of plant materials, determines that everyday castoffs are indicative of a society’s behavior and value system and symptomatic of the current landscape. The works become a forest of objects for viewers to walk around and through. Gazing globes are a decorative form first used in outdoor gardens in the Middle Ages and were thought to hold magical power and to foster good luck or ward off evil.

Exhibition Support
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Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom
Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom, Narrated by Brooke Kamin Rappoport
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