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Lawns Closed Today
Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject Image replaced with SVGInject   | Reseeding in progress
Lawns Open    Lawns Closed
Madison Square Park Conservancy is responsible for the maintenance of the park’s lawns, which includes closing the lawns each year from October through May for reseeding. With the heightened need for public space, the Conservancy has kept the lawns open throughout the pandemic. For the month of April, all lawns will be closed to reestablish the grass in time for summer.

Alison Saar: Feallan and Fallow

Alison Saar 1
Past Exhibition

Alison Saar: Feallan and Fallow

September 22 – 31, 2011
Past Exhibition

Alison Saar: Feallan and Fallow

September 22 – 31, 2011
Alison Saar 1
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Feallan and Fallow includes six works by Alison Saar, an artist distinguished for sculpture and installation — often of the female form — that consider issues of race, gender, and heritage. Inspired by the cyclical forces of nature and by the ancient Greek myth of Persephone, the project in the park takes visitors on a metaphoric journey across the four seasons. It also includes two of the artist’s Treesouls (1994), fourteen-feet high figures with roots for legs. Persephone, daughter of Demeter and Zeus, signifies the earth’s fertility. Her abduction by Hades is mythologized as the cycle of the changing seasons. Feallan and Fallow summons the female figure at different stages of maturation. Spring is an adolescent girl perched high on an existing tree trunk. Her wild head of roots cascades downward to conceal her face; chrysalises in various stages of hatching are woven into her hair and cover her body. Summer is conveyed as a pregnant woman whose womb holds a swarm of fireflies. Fall is a woman of the harvest with a head of branches extending upwards, bearing pomegranates instead of leaves. She holds her skirt in both hands, catching the fallen fruit. Winter, cast in bronze, is a curled figure lying on its side on the ground, suggesting both hibernation and death.

Feallan and Fallow includes six works by Alison Saar, an artist distinguished for sculpture and installation — often of the female form — that consider issues of race, gender, and heritage. Inspired by the cyclical forces of nature and by the ancient Greek myth of Persephone, the project in the park takes visitors on a metaphoric journey across the four seasons. It also includes two of the artist’s Treesouls (1994), fourteen-feet high figures with roots for legs. Persephone, daughter of Demeter and Zeus, signifies the earth’s fertility. Her abduction by Hades is mythologized as the cycle of the changing seasons. Feallan and Fallow summons the female figure at different stages of maturation. Spring is an adolescent girl perched high on an existing tree trunk. Her wild head of roots cascades downward to conceal her face; chrysalises in various stages of hatching are woven into her hair and cover her body. Summer is conveyed as a pregnant woman whose womb holds a swarm of fireflies. Fall is a woman of the harvest with a head of branches extending upwards, bearing pomegranates instead of leaves. She holds her skirt in both hands, catching the fallen fruit. Winter, cast in bronze, is a curled figure lying on its side on the ground, suggesting both hibernation and death.

Exhibition Support
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Abigail Deville: Light of Freedom
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